Silly season! Well done again HMS Gannet.

A few days ago the Sea King aircraft, from HMS Gannet in Ayrshire, had to land on the mountainside as visibility dropped to 40 metres. Petty Officer Mike Henson took to the hill in search of the trio, who were 3,000ft up on the Munro Beinn a’Chroin in the Trossachs.

The three walkers began their day out in the mountains in clear weather, but were caught out by cloud closing in around them near the summit. None of them had a map or compass with them and they were using a smartphone to navigate. The trio became disorientated and cold in the misty conditions.  In the end all were located a bit cold but unhurt, just another few lines in the paper of a good job by the Rescue Services. Well done to the crew at HMS Gannet a great bunch of people.

Navy Sea King in action in the winter – Flying in the mountains especially in winter is not easy. Please remember that these are a huge part of the UK SAR plan and a resource  not just for use for those in the mountains. Check your kit before you go!

 

It is at times the same old story but if you can afford a smart phone then you can have a couple of maps and compass at least with the party? How many times will we here this winter? If out in the hills please be sensible accidents can happen so easily but try not to be be to daft? The clocks go back this week, daylight is less and winter is here now so please be aware and have fun in the short days.

HMS Gannet are Britain’s busiest rescuers. We’re scrambled every day of the year – twice on many – saving lives from Northern Ireland to Edinburgh, the Isle of Man and Lake District to the slopes of Ben Nevis, covering an area of 98,000 square miles (12 times the size of Wales…) with just three Sea King helicopters.

About heavywhalley.MBE

Mountain Rescue Specialist. Environmentalist. Spent 37 years with RAF Mountain Rescue and 3 years with a civilian Team . Still an active Mountaineer when body slows, loves the wild places.
This entry was posted in Equipment, Mountain rescue, mountain safety. Bookmark the permalink.

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