More on Recco Reflectors ! Avalanche

From Davy Gunn

I declare a conflict of interest as one of Recco’s Euro trainers. But bias aside, this has been on the go for years and while not as good as companion rescue, works well which is why over 100+ rescue service use it. Folks who have never used it slag it as a body recovery tool. That’s because the detector is often with an organised MR rescue service who are much later to the scene than companion rescue or ski rescue. It works very well from the air as there is no deflection. It will also find victims with other harmonics such as a mobile but at much reduced range. Only 3 UK search services haveRecco Advanced Rescue Technology (which seems very low). GMRT, LMRT and Glencoe Ski Patrol. Maybe the new SAR Helo will adopt it ( I have the Uk’s only helo kit here in Glencoe). I don’t think climbers will ever adopt a transceiver culture and nor would I suggest they had to. But its simply easier to find someone with a couple of Recco reflectors and with luck, an air pocket and a SAR helo maybe on ops already in the area it might save a life. £17 seems pretty cheap for that. Its another tool for what is regarded as the most succesfull approach which is “collaberative avalanche rescue” where every search method possible (no single one being 100% perfect) is used at the scene asap: from novice spot probing/slalom probing and surface clue searching, to Recco, dogs and formal probe lines (as organised rescue arrives – often later). There is a list of SAR services here:http://www.recco.com/resorts-operations/all-recco-resorts

AUSTRIAAberg HinterthalAltausee-HemmalandAuffach WildschönauBad…
RECCO.COM
Thanks Davy – I would advise anyone who wants any Avalanche Course or Training to contact Davy Gunn he has massive experience in mountain rescue and skiing working as a Ski Patroller for many years in Glencoe, well worth a day or two with a man who knows. It may save your life!
Heavy Whalley

About heavywhalley.MBE

Lecturer and Mountain Rescue Specialist
This entry was posted in Articles, Avalanche info, Mountain rescue, mountain safety, Mountaineering, Scottish winter climbing., Views Mountaineering. Bookmark the permalink.

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