Guy Holeman RIP – Memories of Diran Peak.

Diran - Pakistan 1993

Diran – Pakistan 1993

I had just come back from a great week with Outfitmoray at Applecross and heard the sad news that an old pal he died in an accident. This  news has been on Facebook and other media outlets but a few of Guys pals may have not heard about this. I have put this together.

1993 Diran Peak

In 1993 I went as part of the 50 th Anniversary Expedition we went to Diran is a mountain in the Karakoram range in Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan. This 7,266-metre (23,839 ft) pyramid shaped mountain lies to the east of Rakaposhi (7,788m).Diran Peak in the Himalayas.

On the North Face.

On the North Face.

It was a very tricky expedition and the mountain was constantly swept by avalanches but we managed to get three to the summit and more importantly back safely. Dan Carrol, Carl Vander Lee and Guy all summitted in poor weather. Guy at that time was a member of the SAS and like most of them was a unassuming guy who handled being with the RAF very well. I was especially good at taking the Micky but he just laughed and we all got on great, he like me was a mischievous person . We formed a close bond on the mountain and he was a sound and confident mountaineer.

High altitude summit camp exhaustion even the tough get tired! Photo Dan Carrol

High altitude summit camp exhaustion even the tough get tired! Photo Dan Carrol

We had some laughs and Guy went on to be a very strong mountaineer but also a friend who as you do in the military especially in his specialist unit you heard the odd tale and how good he became. We met occasionally on the hill when he was up training in Scotland with the “men in black”

summit of Diran in the white out - Photo Dan Carrol

Summit of Diran in the white out – Photo Dan Carroll – Guy and Carl

The summit was hard won on Diran and helped make this dangerous mountain a success, unfortunately two Spanish climbers who followed the route up never made it down and were caught out by the weather, avalanches and altitude. This was a big learning curb for us all and Dan Carrol went on in later years t summit on Everest in 2001 with our RAF Mountain Rescue Expedition to the North Ridge.

Guy on Everest

Guy on Everest

I read this account from his local paper – The Hereford

“FORMER SAS soldier and Everest mountaineer tragically died this week after becoming trapped under a trailer.

Emergency services were called to Tillington Business Park at 2.20pm on Monday after concerns were raised for the welfare of Guy Homan.

On arrival, an ambulance crew found the 53-year-old trapped under a trailer and he was confirmed dead at the scene.

Mr Homan, who lived in Tillington, near Hereford, with his wife Holly and three young children, served in the army between 1983 and 2006.

Guye started out in the parachute regiment before joining the SAS.

He was one of 21 army mountaineers who attempted to become the first Britons to scale Mount Everest via the treacherous West Ridge in 2006. They managed to climb within a few hundred metres of the summit before adverse weather and the threat of avalanches put pay to the attempt.

After leaving the armed forces, Mr Homan ran his own tree surgery business and continued his love for climbing locally.

His close friend and fellow Everest mountaineer Malcolm Russell said that he would “inspire others” just by telling the story of the expedition.

He said: “My good friend, Guy Homan, was a soldier, a musician, a writer, a climber and above all a family man.

“Tough and gentle in equal measure. Guy and I have given many lectures together about the expedition, raising money for charities locally and he inspired and gripped people whenever he told our tale.

“He had a remarkable way with words and to many was ‘the diarist’ of the expedition.

“Guy subsequently left the army and became a tree-surgeon, accepting with humour days confined to the insides of leylandii but delighting in time spent aloft in the open tree-tops, relishing his new-found craft.

“With his humour, his smile, and his zest for life he was a friend to many and role-model to many more. He was one of those rare people that everybody seemed to like.

“He adored his family who loved him with equal return and his loss is a desperate tragedy. He will be sorely missed.”

Mr Homan climbed extensively in various mountain ranges including the European and New Zealand Alps, the Canadian Rockies, the Andes, the Karakoram and the Himalayas.

His climbing career culminated with the Everest West Ridge expedition of 2006 in which he was selected for the summit team.”

Some of the words from the troops taken of Facebook etc

Bill Batson  who led our expedition – desperately sad news. Guy was a larger than life character who was overflowing with enthusiasm and positivity. He will be sadly missed.

Carl Vanderlee – Guy was one of the Summiteers of the RAF MRT 50th Anniversary Joint Service Exped to climb Diran (7266m) .in Pakistan. An Expedition organised and led by Bill Batson. He was well liked got on great with the troops and not surprisingly very strong on the hill, but more annoyingly good at scrabble. Thoughts are with family and friends.

Nick Sharp – I had the privilege of being an expedition member with Guy on the RAFMR trip in 92. A quiet and unassuming bloke who had tremendous drive and a likeable humorous nature. RIP.

Dave Bunting, expedition leader on the EWR2006 trip said: “Words were a speciality of Guy Homan, whether written in fantastic expedition blogs and diaries or spoken with compassion and humour, but I am completely lost for my own words right now at hearing the terrible news of the loss of our friend.

“Guy was truly one of the most amazing people I have ever had the pleasure of spending time with. On the West Ridge of Everest in 2006 he was everything you would want in a team; totally committed, utterly resilient to anything thrown at him and just an amazing character to spend time with. In life in general he was an absolute gentlemen. He will be missed by many, many people.”

More from Carl Vanderlee on our Diran expedition – During the final push we snow holed with no sleeping bags and a drink for breakfast …our cache of kit and food had been swept away and I struggled on the last few hundred metres of ascent and was not my normal self and it was Guy and Dan that helped me through that tough moment. They were very patient and encouraging and very strong mountaineers. The ‘clag’ had set in and a quick photo at the summit saw the 2 of them searching for a descent path. Both helped me get down to a level where I recovered sufficiently to go on my own steam. Great camaraderie and to this day I’m thankful to them both.

Diran night

We will miss you.

My thoughts are with Guys family and friends.

“Great things happen when men and mountains meet! ”

Recently I have heard from Guy’s family and they appreciate your comments, Please feel free to pass on any condolences through this blog.

Last shot of the trip.

Last shot of the trip.

 

About heavywhalley.MBE

Lecturer and Mountain Rescue Specialist
This entry was posted in Enviroment, Himalayas/ Everest, Mountaineering. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Guy Holeman RIP – Memories of Diran Peak.

  1. Vicky Whitney says:

    Thank you so much for this – have forwarded to my parents and brother and sister
    Vicky ( Guys sister ))

    • heavywhalley says:

      Dear Vicky

      Thank you for your comments Guy was well thought of by us all in RAF Mountain Rescue.

      My thoughts are with you all at this sad time.

      Kind regards

      Heavy RAF MRT.

  2. sophie homan says:

    It really means so much to read all the wonderful stories and comments about our brother, Thank you.

  3. Tony and Dianne says:

    Devastated. Condolences to Geoff and Joy and family; what a terrible happening, our love and feelings are with you all. Tony and Dianne xx

  4. Vicky Whitney says:

    Guy’s parents were truly grateful to read this tribute- and for photos they have never seen before -a powerful story that felt really special. Thanks again

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