Every day a school day in the Scottish mountains – even for the most experienced.

 

This is from Mountaineering Scotland Press Release and the winter reminders lots of easy simple information, please read and share if possible? I have had three great days on the hills on the last week and learned.

Sat 19 Nov – Cairngorms winter climbing  – crampon fell off, not put on properly check each others every time you put them on and practice, practice, practice. Can your helmet fit over your hat?

Monday 21 Nov  – Ben Wyvis – carry spare battery for phone and GPS it was – 8 in the car park and how many gloves do you need. I carry 3 pairs, check that torch out?

Thursday 24 Nov – My local Corbett Ben Rinnes, we wore campons from the car due to the ice , one of the groups crampons did not fit and we had a bit of a “faff” putting them on. Practice at home and check that your boots fit the crampons.  This wee hill took longer than expected, in winter always look at your route and plan for the conditions.

The weather was superb always check the forecast and from mid December the Avalanche forecast, not just on the day you gp but prior to it before you go.

Drive safely in the winter, winter tyres and carry spare gear and a shovel there was lots of ice about, safe mountaineering.

 

Mountaineering Scotland Logo

Mountaineering Scotland Logo

Every day a school day in the Scottish mountains – even for the most experienced. Scotland’s mountains are a winter playground for thousands of hillwalkers, climbers and mountaineers, with a wide range of experience levels. And examination of the fatal accident statistics for the last year shows it isn’t just novices getting into difficulties. Sadly, 20 people have lost their lives so far in the mountains this year. Ten of these were either approaching, or on, a technical climb.

Three died as a result of avalanche.

Three of the others who died had literally spent a lifetime enjoying the hills.

why-know-navigation

With snow on the mountains, the Mountaineering Scotland reminds everyone heading out to enjoy the hills to pause, think and prepare for the challenges that face us all in winter. Heather Morning, Mountain Safety Adviser with Mountaineering Scotland advises: “Shorter daylight hours, dropping temperatures and the first snow on the hill are all good indicators that it is time to think about extra kit in your rucksack. Routes will take longer than expected in winter conditions and many people will end up finishing in the dark – so a head torch – and spare batteries – is crucial. In fact better still is to carry a spare head torch – as anyone who has tried to change batteries in the cold and dark will testify!” Heather continues: “If you are heading out on the higher tops, now is the time to add crampons, rigid boots to accommodate them, an ice axe and spare essentials such as hats and winter gloves to your essential kit list.”

wyvis-2

With temperatures at 1000m at least 10°c lower than sea level at this time of year – and feeling even lower through the effect of any wind chill – many underestimate how quickly they can feel the cold, which can turn to hypothermia within less than an hour. Extra layers are essential, such as a synthetic duvet jacket, and an emergency bivvi bag stored in the bottom of a rucksack is highly recommended, just in case you have to be stationary on the hill for any length of time. Those who head to the hills with friends or as part of a group are advised to invest in a lightweight, nylon group shelter. This can provide a snug spot for lunch if the weather is poor and a vital refuge if someone in a group is injured and they have to wait for help to arrive. Want to learn more? Every winter Mountaineering Scotland reaches out to the wider mountaineering community; teaming up with outdoor shops across the country to offer a series of free winter mountain skills talks. 11 talks are held at venues from Inverness to Edinburgh, designed to give a taster of essential skills for novices and a refresher for seasoned mountaineers. Heather explained: “We find that an effective way to get the message out to less experienced mountain lovers or those who want to progress from summer hillwalking to winter mountaineering, is to reach them through our free talks.

 

“Dealing with winter conditions and avalanche avoidance isn’t just a case of buying all the right gear: the right knowledge and experience is crucial.” The Mountaineering Scotland also runs a number of subsidised winter mountain skills training courses, and provides further guidance and skills videos, together with details of free talks, on their website at http://www.mountaineering.scot/safety-and-skills Ends

 

Get out and check the gear simple skills may save your life.

Get out and check the gear simple skills may save your life.

Further information contact: (Please note new email addresses) Heather Morning, Mountain Safety Adviser, on 01479 861241 or heather@mountaineering.scot Neil Reid, Communications Officer, on 01738 493941 or 07788871803 or neil@mountaineering.scot About Mountaineering Scotland:

 

Mountaineering Scotland (formerly the MCofS) will again be hosting a series of safety evenings this winter. Heather Morning, Mountaineering Scotland’s Safety Advisor, will share her beautiful photography, videos, personal anecdotes and adventures, while discussing essential skills for winter navigation, avalanche awareness, route choice, equipment, mountain weather and much more.

With a lifetime’s experience in the mountains, Heather has been a professional mountaineer for 25 years and was a member of Cairngorm Mountain Rescue Team for 16 years. These entertaining and informative evenings will be held on the following dates and locations. Whilst free, you need to book a place, the two events at the Mountain Cafe in Aviemore also have the option of booking for a delicious pre-lecture mea

Monday 28 November, 7pm – Stirling
Cotswold Outdoor store, Dobbies Garden Centre, Drip Road, Craigforth, Stirling FK9 4UF. Book now on 01786 241200

Tuesday 29 November, 7pm – Perth
Tiso, Highland Gateway, Inveralmond roundabout, Perth PH1 3EE. Book now on 01738 634464

Wednesday 30 November, 7pm – Dundee
Tiso, 22 Whitehall St, Dundee DD1 4AF. Book now on 01382 221153

Tuesday 6 December, 7pm – Inverness
Tiso, Longman Industrial Estate, Inverness IV1 1SN. Book now on 01463 729171

Wednesday 7 December, 7pm – Glasgow
Tiso, Glasgow Outdoor Experience, 50 Coupar Street, Glasgow G4 0DL. Book now on 0141 559 5450

Thursday 8 December, 7pm – Edinburgh
Tiso, Edinburgh Outdoor Experience, 41 Commerical Street, Leith EH6 6JD. Book now on 0131 554 0804

Wednesday 4 January, 7pm – Edinburgh
Cotswold Outdoor Store, 72 Rose Street, Edinburgh EH2 2NN. Book now on 0131 341 2063

Thursday 5 January, 7pm – Glasgow
Cotswold Outdoor Store, 30 West End Retail Park, 60 Crow Road, Partick Glasgow G11 7RY. Book now on 0141 357 5353

Wednesday 8 February, 7pm (meal) & 8pm (lecture) – Aviemore
Lecture free, meal available £13, booking is essential, Mountain Café, Aviemore. Book now on 01479 812473

Wednesday 15 February, 7pm (meal), 8pm (lecture) – Mountain Cafe, Aviemore

This lecture will be given by Heavy Whalley, mountain rescue legend. Lecture free, meal available £13, booking essential. Book now on 01479 812473

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• Mountaineering Scotland is the only recognised representative organisation for hill walkers, climbers and ski-tourers who live in Scotland or who enjoy Scotland’s mountains. • Mountaineering Scotland provides training and information to mountain users to promote safety, self-reliance and the enjoyment of our mountain environment. • The MCofS is a membership organisation with over 13,000 members representing hill walkers, climbers and mountaineers, funded through a combination of membership subscriptions, non-governmental grants and investment from sportscotland, which supports public initiatives and services in mountain safety, mountain training and the development and promotion of mountaineering activities. • Mountaineering Scotland also acts for 75,000 members of the BMC or British Mountaineering Council on matters related to Landscape and Access in Scotland. • Mountaineering Scotland landscape and access work is supported financially by the Scottish Mountaineering Trust and the BMC • Mountaineering Scotland has launched the ClimbScotland initiative to encourage young people to participate in climbing and support their progression. It offers a dedicated website and a development team, which will introduce young people to climbing at schools, climbing walls and via youth organisations with a range of activities and events, while developing kids clubs and providing specialist support to parents, volunteers and teachers. • Mountaineering Scotland is the national governing body for sports climbing. It offers pathways to climbing coaching, organises and promotes a range of regional and national climbing competitions, and manages the Scottish climbing and bouldering teams. It contributes to the management of the GB teams with the ultimate aim of seeing a Scottish athlete achieve a podium position in the Olympic Games. • Mountaineering Scotland is the new name for the Mountaineering Council of Scotland (MCofS), which acts to represent, support and promote Scottish mountaineering. • Mountaineering Council of Scotland remains the registered company name. • The MCofS is a not for profit company limited by guarantee and incorporated in Scotland. Company number SC322717. • Mountaineering Scotland, The Granary, West Mill Street, Perth PH1 5QP

 

About heavywhalley.MBE

Lecturer and Mountain Rescue Specialist
This entry was posted in Avalanche info, Enviroment, Friends, Mountain rescue, mountain safety, Mountaineering, SAR, Scottish winter climbing., Views Mountaineering, Weather. Bookmark the permalink.

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