Off to Glencoe – The Alex MacIntyre Memorial Hut

 

Last night myself and Jack went over to Rachel a Shane’s its been a long time since I ate so well, Today I am off on the Moray Mountaineering Club weekend meet in Onich near Glencoe. I will do some visiting in the way, it is very mild now and a lot of the snow is gone so maybe I will get a new Corbett in, we will see.

 

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In the autumn of 1982, at the age of 28, MacIntyre was killed by a single stone while setting up a new route on Annapurna‘s South Face.[9] In light of his contribution to British climbing, particularly advances in the ‘light and fast’ style of alpinism, the ‘Alex MacIntyre Memorial Hut’ was set up in the West Highlands where it is managed by the British Mountaineering Council and the Mountaineering Council of Scotland.

The Alex MacIntyre Memorial Hut is located between Glencoe and Fort William, at North Ballachulish, in the Western Highlands. It is ideally located for walkers and climbers wishing to explore Ben Nevis and Glencoe.

This National Hut is jointly owned by the BMC and the MCofS, and is run by a management committee of volunteers which reports to both councils.

The hut can accommodate sixteen people in five different bedrooms. Facilities include a well-equipped kitchen, drying room and car park. The hut is open to Club and Individual members of the BMC/MCofS.

One day as a tiger .

One day as a tiger .

One Day As A Tiger, John Porter’s revelatory and poignant memoir of his friend Alex MacIntyre, shows mountaineering at its extraordinary best and tragic worst and draws an unforgettable picture of a dazzling, argumentative and exuberant legend.

The wall was the ambition, the style became the obsession.’ In the autumn of 1982, a single stone fell from high on the south face of Annapurna and struck Alex MacIntyre on the head, killing him instantly and robbing the climbing world of one of its greatest talents.

Although only twenty-eight years old, Alex was already one of the leading figures of British mountaineering’s most successful era. His ascents included hard new routes on Himalayan giants like Dhaulagiri and Changabang and a glittering record of firsts in the Alps and Andes. Yet how Alex climbed was as important as what he climbed. He was a mountaineering prophet, sharing with a handful of contemporaries including his climbing partner Voytek Kurtyka the vision of a purer form of alpinism on the world’s highest peaks.

 

About heavywhalley.MBE

Lecturer and Mountain Rescue Specialist
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