Some good comments on Boots, hill running trainers and Approach shoes the hill. Comments as always welcome.

Thanks for all your comments on boots on the hill. The main point was to remind folks that they need to check there soles to ensure the tread is still good. There were many comments that a lot of folk use approach shoes on the hill. I do at times but again it’s worth checking your soles for grip! When Approach shoes came out I used a pair on the Rum ridge they were great but I trashed them. Nowadays they are better and as I broke my ankle many years ago I prefer to protect my ankles a bit more. It’s personal preference in the end.

Running shoes. They are designed for the hill with big tread. Many are taking this up and loving the freedom they give. There are so many brands now on the market in my day your choice was limited to Walsh’s and I did some superb days on the long hill like Tranters Round when I was fit. These were wonderful days as you could go light and felt at one with the mountains. Unfortunately my running days are over and I still miss that freedom.

Running shoes on Arran

My friend Adrian on All things Cullin gives some great advice on footwear what to wear on the Skye Ridge. A unique test of footwear? Please have a look at “All things Cullin” on Face book

Comment : These days I don’t wear mountain boots but do wear wellies with vibram soles. When they get worn down I get them resoled here, https://lancashiresportsrepairs.co.uk/
I think it’s good value! A few folk that I trust said they often used Approach shoes on the hill any more information, advice comments would be great?

The point of my ramblings were to have a look at the soles of your boots approach shoes, running shoes. Many of us have been walking low level during the Covid restrictions. Boots approach shoes have been hammered as we walk in different places. So please have a look at your soles.

About heavywhalley.MBE

Mountain Rescue Specialist. Environmentalist. Spent 37 years with RAF Mountain Rescue and 3 years with a civilian Team . Still an active Mountaineer when body slows, loves the wild places.
This entry was posted in Articles, Books, Gear, Mountaineering, People, Recomended books and Guides, Views Mountaineering, Well being. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Some good comments on Boots, hill running trainers and Approach shoes the hill. Comments as always welcome.

  1. Good advice Heavy. You may remember the circumstances surrounding you donating a pair of boots to my son Coron. We arrived at Dundonnel mid afternoon so Coron and l decided to walk over towards Shenavall. The rains came down heavily, waterproofs donned and on we went. Minutes later Coron mentioned one of his feet was soaking. We stopped and l checked his boot to be encountered by a split accross the sole of his boot. KSB 3s. I later discovered there were numerous reports of soles deteriorating after 3 or 4 years no matter how much they had been used.

    You certainly saved the day loaning and then giving Coron your spare boots. Had we not gone for our “blow the cobwebs out” bimble the following day to ascend Liathach, Meggie’s last Munroe would have beed a disaster.

    PS This was Coron’s 1st Munroe.

    Like

  2. Richard Perou says:

    At my age the mountains are now only available to look at. However despite our dryish climate in Herault you still need reasonable footwear to wander about. This past winter I bought a pair of Hoka lightweight boots as I had been wearing their products all summer.
    What a revelation, waterproof, lightweight, vibram soles and COMFORTABLE.

    Like

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